ORI ACSL

Applied Computer Simulation Labs

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General Publications

The New york Times - Tools for the Disabled

New York Times

THE LIVING ARTS


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13, 1994


In Virtual ReaIity, Tools for the Disabled

An Entertainment, So Far


Virtual reality technology has long been used to train airline and Air Force pilots in flight simulators and more recently to simulate activity in space for astronauts.

So far, only the entertainment in-dustry has made virtual reality avail-able to the public, in video arcades and amusement parks. But others are beginning to experiment with the technology for purposes other than amusement, including ways to im-prove the lives of the disabled.

Virtual reality technology is still expensive, and until the costs drop it will remain in the hands of theorists and developers. Even the crudest sys-tems cost $30,000, and the imagery on most of the applications - including the one that Christopher is using - is more cartoonish than real.

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VR Education and Rehabilitation

VR Education and Rehabilitation

Dean P. Inman, Ken Loge, and John Leavens

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Virtual Reality Solutions for Children with Physical Disabilities

Virtual Reality Solutions for Children

With Physical Disabilities


The Second International Conference

on the Military Applications of Synthetic

Environments and Virtual Reality

MASEVR '95

Dr. Dean Inman (presenter), Mr. Ken Loge, and Mr. John Leavens

Oregon Research Institute

Applied Computer Simulation Labs

Eugene, Oregon, U.S.A.



INTRODUCTION

The notion that childhood development is directly related to being able to independently explore one's environment is now widely accepted among social scientists, cognitive psychologists, and early childhood education specialists. A significant body of research has presented evidence over the last twenty-five years that self-locomotion experience plays an important role in the development of spatial perceptual abilities and cognition (Held and Hein, 1963; Bertenthal, Campos and Barrett, 1984; Adolph, Gibson and Eppler, 1990; Acredolo and Evans, 1980; Kermoian and Campos, 1988; Bertenthal and Bai, 1987; Horobin and Acredolo, 1986). These skills form an integral part of how we interact with and utilize our environment.

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Virtual Reality Report

Virtual Reality Report

The International Newsletter of VR Vol.4 No.5 May, 1994



From The Editor

Sandra K. Helsel


It's seldom in this editorial that I write about a VR application that magnifies and extends the human spirit. But a VR project demonstrated at a "VR and Disabilities" session at the recent Technology and Disabilities Conference in Los Angeles in March was such a powerful example of a technology meeting a human need that I felt humbled both personally and professionally.

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VR People

VR People

Angie Buckert-Donelson


While the promises of VR have lured the dreamers, skeptics have questioned whether the tech-nology would live up to its poten-tial. Orthopedic research scientist Dean Inman was one of the doubtful. Although fascinated by the potential applications of VR in his work with disabled children, he doubted the high-priced technology would be a practical tool that could give him results. Inman's misgivings began to fade away two years ago when his wife, Dr. Lynne Anderson-Inman, director of the Center for Election Studying at the University of Oregon, returned from a conference on interactive tech-nology. She was inspired after hearing Brenda Laurel, a prominent author and artist in the field of VR. Laurel spoke on new developments in VR that were dramatically bringing down costs and improving the quality of the technology.

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